With a personal connection to how the political power of elite special interests disenfranchises everyday Americans, new American Promise team member Corinne Noonan is committed to helping fix the system and ensure a voice for every American.

People connect with the American Promise movement for many reasons. For Corinne Noonan, her experiences growing up in a small town in New Hampshire helped shape her desire to give a voice to every American.

As Corinne watched local businesses shutter, she heard her neighbors express feelings of powerlessness to make real change. Many didn’t feel like voting was worthwhile and were completely checked out of the political process.

After graduating in 2018 from Wesleyan University, Corinne decided she wanted to help make the system work for the benefit of the people. She worked on a U.S. Senate race and environmental campaigns and organized with the ACLU’s non-partisan effort to bring key civil liberties into the conversation in the 2020 presidential primary.

When Corinne discovered American Promise and its mission to end unlimited political spending in our elections, she was reminded of her community. In ending corporate domination of our politics, Corinne sees an opportunity to give a voice to her neighbors and create the democracy they deserve.

What is your role at American Promise?

As Leadership Gifts Officer, I work with the Development Team to grow and cultivate our donor support base. This means learning about why people have gotten involved, finding ways to get new people involved, and educating folks about American Promise’s mission and why they should join this community. I’m excited by the prospect of ending the influence of big money in politics, because it is at the core of so many of the issues I care about most deeply.

Why is American Promise’s work important to you?

I grew up in a small town in a more rural part of the country. Time and again, I saw small businesses struggle to compete against large corporations and heard community members express the sentiment that they didn’t care to vote because it wouldn’t make a difference anyway.

Individual citizens should feel like they have a say in this democracy, and I think the best way to reinvigorate faith in our political systems is to stop the outsized influence corporations have on politics in this country.

So many issues can never be solved without giving the power back to the people—for example, if we continue to let the oil and gas industries sit in the pockets of politicians, furthering legislation to combat climate change will be next to impossible. A 28th Amendment would alter the political landscape, creating space for candidates from more diverse backgrounds to run for office and for our elected officials to act on what their constituents want, rather than binding them to the agenda of corporate America.

Why would you encourage people across America to join the movement for the 28th Amendment?

The democratic process is supposed to be about the chance for every individual to have their voice heard. In giving corporations the same liberties as people, we’ve drowned out those voices. Whatever the issue may be that matters most to you, you have a far greater chance of your legislators hearing you if you’re not competing with powerful corporate interests.

What is one of the main missions you hope to accomplish as a member of the American Promise team?

I hope to connect not just with people who are already politically engaged but with people like the ones I grew up hearing who were disaffected by the system. I want to have conversations that inspire people to take a chance on American Promise’s goal because they see it as a path out of the dysfunction that has turned them off to democratic participation. One of the most rewarding aspects of working in this field is seeing people realize that they can make a difference and that they are not alone in feeling like change needs to happen.

If we don’t fight back against the status quo, nothing will change. Corporations might have the money, but we have the people power. I see the fight for a 28th Amendment as an opportunity to start building a system that works for everybody, rather than a few powerful special interests.